Part 3: Pastiche

 “The pastiche of the British wartime poster ‘Keep Calm and Carry On’ has been employed to present a wide range of viewpoints, some political, others lifestyle-based. The pastiche works by maintaining the basic visual language of typography and layout while changing the punchline to re-interpret what people might want to keep calm about.

Pick a design or other cultural artefact that you can pastiche to create new meanings. Reflect on the meaning of the original item and deconstruct the narratives or meanings that are already in play within it. What is the key message intended by the designer? What other potential readings are possible? For example, a 1970s advert for cigarettes showing a man smoking at a bar will have been created with the intention of making smoking look manly, social, normal – or some other message to encourage people to smoke. Our reading of the advert is likely to be informed by concerns about the health risks of smoking, its unsocial nature (especially if you live in a country with a public smoking ban), or changing attitudes about what constitutes ‘manly’.

While pastiche is a commonly used tactic in campaigning, you may feel uncomfortable about copying and manipulating somebody else’s work; after all, it could be your own design that is being reworked! On the other hand, you could view pastiche as a form of visual conversation in which ideas are reframed, questioned and commented on. Reflect on your views about pastiche in your learning log.”

Some fun pastiche examples…

We can easily pick up the references if we have see the originals…the Beetles meets lego, 1940s meets Buffy…

We were asked to reflect on our views about pastiche. I think my views are positive. It all hinges on our recognition – I would guess not much pastiche works globally. Its fun being ‘in’ on the joke. We might well have either fondness or respect for the original – such as the Mona Lisa. And to subvert the original can be an act of affectionate fun. I also love the idea of modern life entering the garden of eden. I think stand up comics sometimes say that part of comedy is putting unlikely thing together and leading us to an unexpected conclusion. But sometimes pastiche can be angrier – a battle cry against global business and exploitation.

I went to bed thinking oh I know, I’ll do something related to road signs and instructional information or warning signs…Then I woke up and realised its already been done. (Heres a few hidden amongst the real ones.

After more pondering I thought about all the lovely typography on websites such ‘Not on the High Street’…You can buy numerous products complete with inspirational words

But the more you look, the more it gets…A Bit Annoying

I can’t deny they are very attractive

And sometimes Im all up for a life affirming quote

Oh no. I’m really fond of wine and chocolate too. (I do like ‘Yay I remembered to bring my bag’!)

So being British obviously I have to revert to sarcasm. And just as The Little Book of Calm was followed by the Little Book of Crap, here’s my tribute to all those words of wisdom.

Step 1. Thanks to Pixabay I downloaded a suitable image…

Step 2. And added my own unique wording in photoshop

Reflect on the meaning of the original item and deconstruct the narratives or meanings that are already in play within it. What is the key message intended by the designer? What other potential readings are possible?

Um…I think maybe I picked a very modern trend to pastiche…So the original meaning was to inspire and hang on your wall as a thing of beauty. They key message was the inspirational quote. I don’t think you can read a lot else into this. Maybe I should have picked something else. Sorry.

Refs

https://group5108mc.wordpress.com/2014/11/22/pastiche/

https://rmaloney918.wordpress.com/2015/11/10/pastiche/

http://theesotericcuriosa.blogspot.co.uk/2011/10/esoteric-wordsmyth-for-enriching_27.html

pinterest.com

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